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Posts Tagged ‘tomato sauce’

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"The Lot"

Aussies also have their own version of a hamburger. This was introduced to me here immediately, as I am an American and everybody in the world seems to associate hamburgers and cheeseburgers automatically with Americans. This hamburger with “the lot” was shared with me as if it were meant to impress me… And it did. It was delicious, filling and almost impossible to eat without drooling at the first sight of it.

The burger with “the lot” in Australia is typically available at pubs, restaurants and take-away shops [or fish and chip shops] throughout Oz. The toppings between the buns are usually:

· Beef patty
· Cheese
· Grilled onion
· Beetroot
· Pineapple slice
· Fried egg [with soft yolk]
· Bacon
· Tomato slice
· Lettuce
· Pickle
· Tomato sauce [or barbecue sauce]
· Optional mayo and/or mustard

Who’s got the best “lot burger” Down Under?

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Burger with "The Lot"

You can be the judge yourself, or you can rely on word-of-mouth… Or a Google search, such as the results of Queenslander Sean Muir’s search for the “ultimate lot burger”, as seen here.

What’s served with Australia’s take on its American counterpart?

Chips [fries], which are often seasoned with chicken salt. It all depends on your taste. You might also find burgers served with one of a variety of salads, such as potato salad, macaroni salad, or a vegetable salad [“dinner salad”].

Do Australians call hamburger meat at the supermarket “ground beef”, like what it’s called in American supermarkets?

No, they refer to it more commonly as “mince”.

Do Australians like to cook hamburgers on the grill [“barby”]?

Yes. Click here to read more.

Why do Aussies add things such as fried egg, beetroot and pineapple to their burger?

I’m not sure why. I’ve asked around and a few responses from Aussies were that pineapple possibly adds the flavor flavour of summer, and the toppings seem to speak for the individual taste of Australians [who really seem to love beetroots, by the way]. You can read more about the Australian hamburger here.

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Bacon & Egg Roll

Within my first week in Australia, I was introduced to the bacon and egg roll for breakfast brekkie. Had I ever tried a bacon and egg roll in my life before coming Australia? Yes, possibly, but most likely not the way that it’s done Down Under.

More than just a cure for a hangover, the bacon and egg roll seems to me to be one of Australia’s favorite favourite choices in the a.m.

Aussies like to eat their bacon & egg roll topped with:
· Tomato sauce
· Barbecue sauce
· Cheese
· Fresh tomato slices or roasted tomato
· Or whatever you wish!

It’s simply just a few rashers of bacon and an egg cooked over easy, served in a bread roll. The best bacon and egg roll I’ve eaten here {so far} came from the Salty Rooster in Manly. The bread was just the right size and lightly toasted, and the bacon was perfect-o.

What seems to make a good bacon & egg roll?
It depends on taste.  I judge each by the bread/roll — I’ve had overly toasted bread, rolls that were too hard and/or too big, and I want for the egg to be at least slightly runny. I also judge each by the quality of the bacon — Is the bacon mostly fat, too greasy or comes out of the roll in one bite? I consider this to be not worth the effort of my shrugging off my diet for one morning…

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A bacon & egg roll at the Scarborough Hotel

Curious to try one too?
There are many cafés and takeaway places in Oz where you will find the bacon and egg roll on the menu.  In the vicinity of Sydney alone, I’ve probably eaten already more than a dozen at random places.

Here are some of the places {with my 5-star rating of each} where I’ve tried the bacon & egg roll:

· Ocean View Sandwich Bar, Dee Why ★★★
· Salty Rooster, Manly ★★★★
· Scarborough Hotel, Scarborough ★★★
· Zimzala, Cronulla ★★★★
· And, of course, McDonald’sMaccas” ★★

Each ★ is for quality of the bacon, the roll, the service and the overall taste.

Note: Some takeaway locations will charge you around 50¢ for each tomato sauce packet. Also several locations of McDonald’s has put barbecue sauce on my bacon and egg roll without asking me first. Not a nice surprise at 6 a.m. for the untrained bacon and egg roll eater…

Feel free to share here all about your thoughts on the perfect bacon and egg roll, as well as your favorite favourite bacon and egg roll experience Down Under!

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Within the first day 12 hours of being in Sydney, I was introduced to meat pies by an Australian. It was outside of the hotel I stayed in {Blue at Woolloomooloo — Say that 10 times, fast}, my very first night in Australia, at a Harry’s Cafe de Wheels stand, one of many locations found in the Sydney-area.  Upon approach, I was told all about meat pies and how Harry’s was a classic with such fervor fervour.  I noted it.

What is a meat pie?
A meat pie is hand-sized and filled with diced or minced meat and gravy, sometimes also onions, mushrooms, etc {more here}.

There are many varieties to choose from, as well as a number of vegetarian-options. I remember these also being available in America in the frozen food-section of the supermarket, known as “pot pies.”

Where are meat pies sold?
Meat pies are sold all over Australia, but here are a few places around Sydney where you’ll easily find them:

· Harry’s Cafe de Wheels
· Robertson Pie Shop
· Pie Face
· Pie in the Sky
· Convenience stores and “servos” {Aussie for “service station”}
· Pubs
· Outdoor kiosks/stands — Some sell Mrs. Mac’s pies.
· Sports arenas

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Pie and Can — Outside of a store near Austinmer Beach in NSW

Many of the places which sell meat pies might want for you to know that they have been somehow at some time rated best meat pie — There even is an annual “Official Great Aussie Meat Pie Competition” — Somehow it matters, but it doesn’t mean their meat pie tastes any good today. Word of mouth has told me that Harry’s, Robertson, Upper Crust and another called Hamlet’s sell the best…

Slang:
Many of the Aussies I know call a meat pie with tomato sauce “dog’s eye and dead horse.”  It’s part of their “rhyming slang,” which you can read more about here.

How to eat a meat pie dog’s eye and dead horse:
Either top the meat pie with tomato sauce or smother each bite with tomato sauce.  It’s an on-the-go type of food, so it’s available takeaway and usually easy to eat while sitting on the train or ferry.  You can also order it with mash {Aussie for “mashed potatoes”}, {mushy} peas and/or gravy and eat it with a fork and knife.

Best and worst meat pies I’ve ever eaten:
I had one from Harry’s which was good, called a “tiger.” It is served with mash, mushy peas and gravy. Pie Face, on two separate attempts, was the worst.  I just suggest you try them all so you can judge for yourself.  My next pie will be from Cronulla Pie Shop.

Do Aussies really love meat pies?
Yes. Yes, yes, yes. Be sure to mention it the next time you meet an Australian and most likely their eyes will light up. If they’re abroad, it might even make them homesick.

Here’s some more proof of how much Aussies love meat pies:

Remember — They love “football, meat pies, kangaroos and Holden cars.”

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Dog's eye and dead horse

Tomato sauce seems to be a staple in every Australian household. Whenever I set the table, whether it’s for breakfast [Aussie: “breaky” or “brekky”], lunch or dinner, I always just put it on the table — Regardless of what is being served.

A beginner’s list of foods you will find it served with:

· Bacon and egg roll
· Meat pie {Aussie: “dog’s eye”}
· Steak {Aussie: “steak”}
· Mashed potatoes {Aussie: “mash”}
· Sausage sandwich {Aussie: “banger sanger”}

All in the list of the above I will cover about eventually…

Also known as “dead horse”, tomato sauce comes in “squeezy” bottles, single-serve packets and {like pictured above & below} single-serve squeeze-on packages. The brands: MasterFoods, Heinz, Rosella, Fountain or store-brand.

Note: Some restaurants will charge something around 50¢ for a packet of tomato sauce.

Barbecue sauce
Tomato sauce’s cousin, it’s often used on bacon and egg rolls and sausage sandwiches.  At McDonald’s {Aussies call it “Maccas”}, they’ve put bbq sauce on my breakfast bacon and egg roll without even asking me, so it’s something to take note of.

Squeeze-on

Squeeze-on Tomato Sauce

Ketchup [or catsup]
Ketchup is just like tomato sauce and it can be found in Australia.  If it says “ketchup” on the label, then it’s a typical American branding of that because ketchup is generally American to an Australian’s perception.  For example, you can also find American mustard packaged for Australian consumers.

Tomato sauce and fries chips? 
Yes, Aussies like to eat their fries {Aussies call them “chips”} with tomato sauce.

Tomah-toe or tomay-toe?
I grew up saying tomay-toe, but now I find myself saying it Aussie-style.

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