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Posts Tagged ‘Boned’

© thingsaussieslike.wordpress.comI‘ve had to take a break from posting lately because I’ve been busier than ever. Australian immigration required that I leave the country again in order for my partner visa to be issued to me… It’s hard to explain it all in one breath — Here is what all I’ve gone through since the first day I arrived Down Under: I was here first on a 12-month tourist visa. When that expired, I had to go offshore and apply for my partner visa and another tourist visa. While the partner visa processed, I could return to Australia on my new tourist visa {only 6 months were granted to me} and await the partner visa. When my partner visa was ready, it could only be granted if I again left Oz… Are you still with me? Any questions?

Since there are no countries immediately bordering Australia that we could just drive to, my husband and I had become almost hopelessly broke from airfares/traveling fees & all of the visa fees. Thankfully Australian immigration also has finally allowed me to start searching for work now {I was not allowed to work on a tourist visa — Without an already existing & valid work sponsor down here, you can’t get a work visa if you’re over the age of 30}. But, with my sanity and humor humour still intact, I have also came across a slew of new & hilarious Aussie-isms — Some might make your head spin!

One evening recently, we had friends from “Vico” {aka Victoria} up for a visit. We decided to keep dinner simple: throw it all on the “barbie” {aka barbecue}. However, I kept calling the barbecue “the grill”. They started to take the piss out of me for this, to which I facetiously would say grill instead whenever possible. Where I’m from, they call it a barbecue, grill or even a Weber {Weber’s U.S. website even calls them “grills”}. Whatever, right? Down here you call it the barbie or the barbecue. A “grill” is what some homes down here have, if they have a stove “cooktop” and oven unit combination, or a “cooker”. You can also have a cooker {eg, a slow cooker} on your kitchen “benchtop”, or what I’ve always known to be a counter or countertop… Anyway, the grill is a separate cooking compartment above the oven. And the stove is not a “stove”, folks. It’s known as a “cooktop” by the Aussies. Thankfully a spoon is also called a spoon in the merry old land of Oz.

And now I’ve got my own car — I’m learning new words for parts of this car left and right! The hood over the engine of the car is the “bonnet”, the trunk is the “boot”, the windshield is the “windscreen”… And don’t forget that lights and bulbs are “lamps” or “globes”. Oh, and the flashlight in the emergency kit is a “torch”. Driving while sitting on the other side of the car {right-side drive in Australia} is one thing, but driving a manual transmission, shifting gears with your left hand for the first time, is another! Mostly all of the laws of the road are the same, but you’ll find much more roundabouts than in America. And pedestrians walk on a “footpath”, not on a sidewalk. They also cross at a “zebra crossing”, not at a crosswalk. You’ll also notice some streets are called “parade” {abbreviated pde} or “crescent” {abbreviated cres} — These are new to me. As for the fuel, if it’s not diesel, you can say you’re going to the gas station service station or the “servo” to get fuel or unleaded, but always make sure you specifically call it “petrol” and not gas or gasoline. “Gas” is LPG down here…

We’re also smack in the middle of renovations a “reno” in the home, so we’ve had to employ some tradesmen, or “tradies”, like a “sparky” {aka electrician}, a “chippy” {aka carpenter}, and a “bricky” {aka bricklayer}. Last, but not least, there’s the “poo man”… Can you guess which one that is?

A plumber. Seriously.
I would have reckoned a “plumby” or “plumbo”, but no…

Unless the plumber was also just taking the piss out of me, that’s what I’m told some plumbers are calling themselves here Down Under.  {I’ve double-checked with my husband and, yes, this is what some plumbers call themselves — As a matter of fact, he has a good mate who is a plumber, who also refers to himself as a “poo man”…}

If you have red hair {I don’t}, you could be called:

Ranga {short for orangutan} — Said rang-uh
Bluey {also what blue bottle jellyfish are called by the Aussies}

Don’t be offended — It’s normal here.

If you’re tired, you can say you’re “knackered”, “buggered”, or that you’re simply “stuffed”.

For those who are thirsty —

Wanna have some coffee?

“Flat white” = Similar to a latte or café au lait; a cappuccino also comes close, but the foam is dry instead.
“Short black” = This is an espresso, usually served in a little cup.
“Long black” = This is an Americano. It’s a coffee which is half-water with a shot or two of espresso.

Keen for a beer?

“Schooner” = Usual size of a beer served in a pub, it’s just slightly smaller than a pint.
“Pot” = Almost a half-pint of beer.
“Middy” = Same as a “pot”.
“Draught” = Draft. I’m always chatting away about this one…

Or do you fancy some fruity-type of drink?

“Cordial” = {note: some Aussies pronounce this “cordigal”} This is a concentrated non-alcoholic syrup. Most choices are fruit flavors flavours or are made from fruit juice. Before you drink it, it’s to be mixed with water, but it can optionally be mixed with club soda or alcohol. Kind of like Kool-Aid
“Squash”
= Similar to cordial.
“Lemonade” = It’s not American lemonade, which is made from lemons, water and sugar. According to Wikipedia:

In Australia and New Zealand, lemonade can also refer to any clear, carbonated soft drink with a primarily lemon flavor; e.g. a lemon-lime soft drink, such as Sprite. Culturally however, with a drink such as Sprite, the flavor is not recognised as “lemon-lime”, but just plain “lemonade”, although it is still the same flavor as its international counterpart. Other colored (and flavored) soft drinks are sometimes referred to by their color such as “red lemonade” or “green lemonade”, implying that “lemonade” is the clear version of its “flavored” counterparts.

I have put together a list of Aussie slang and Aussie-isms {I constantly add more to it too} on this page, if you want to see more.

Now if you thought that this was bad, you should make your next stop to the very lovely New Zealand, like we did. We went to New Zealand while my partner visa was to be issued and visited the south island. Upon arrival, we were told to get some crayfish in Kaikoura at “Nun’s Bun” — That would be “Nin’s Bin”, actually. Someone spelled a word out for me and said something like “hitch” for the letter H {for H, Aussies say haytch, instead of aytch}. That was awfully confusing for me, but I loved hearing the Kiwis {it’s OK to call someone from New Zealand a “Kiwi”} say “fish and chips” — It sounded like fwush-en-chups.

Here’s a sample of the dialect in New Zealand:

Another sort of Aussie-ism, Aussies like to take the piss out of the way that the Kiwis speak, so this video was quite popular with a lot of people Down Under.

Update 24 May 2012:

I’ve just begun reading this book called Boned by Anonymous — It’s an Australian book, based in Sydney. I have only just begun reading the prologue of the book and within 2 pages find that there are several words which you’d need an Aussie English to American English dictionary to help guide you. The words that you might need to look up there: short black, trackie daks, message bank, bugger, verandah, CBD, sculled…

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