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Posts Tagged ‘barbie’

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"The Lot"

Aussies also have their own version of a hamburger. This was introduced to me here immediately, as I am an American and everybody in the world seems to associate hamburgers and cheeseburgers automatically with Americans. This hamburger with “the lot” was shared with me as if it were meant to impress me… And it did. It was delicious, filling and almost impossible to eat without drooling at the first sight of it.

The burger with “the lot” in Australia is typically available at pubs, restaurants and take-away shops [or fish and chip shops] throughout Oz. The toppings between the buns are usually:

· Beef patty
· Cheese
· Grilled onion
· Beetroot
· Pineapple slice
· Fried egg [with soft yolk]
· Bacon
· Tomato slice
· Lettuce
· Pickle
· Tomato sauce [or barbecue sauce]
· Optional mayo and/or mustard

Who’s got the best “lot burger” Down Under?

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Burger with "The Lot"

You can be the judge yourself, or you can rely on word-of-mouth… Or a Google search, such as the results of Queenslander Sean Muir’s search for the “ultimate lot burger”, as seen here.

What’s served with Australia’s take on its American counterpart?

Chips [fries], which are often seasoned with chicken salt. It all depends on your taste. You might also find burgers served with one of a variety of salads, such as potato salad, macaroni salad, or a vegetable salad [“dinner salad”].

Do Australians call hamburger meat at the supermarket “ground beef”, like what it’s called in American supermarkets?

No, they refer to it more commonly as “mince”.

Do Australians like to cook hamburgers on the grill [“barby”]?

Yes. Click here to read more.

Why do Aussies add things such as fried egg, beetroot and pineapple to their burger?

I’m not sure why. I’ve asked around and a few responses from Aussies were that pineapple possibly adds the flavor flavour of summer, and the toppings seem to speak for the individual taste of Australians [who really seem to love beetroots, by the way]. You can read more about the Australian hamburger here.

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A snag on the barbie

Aussies love sausages and, to avoid any further confusion, it’s best to know that they call them “snags” and “bangers.”

They are available in a plethora of flavors flavours, such as:

· Sun Dried Tomato & Basil
· Honey Macadamia Chicken
· Beef, Mushroom & Garlic
· Moroccan Lamb
· Apricot Chicken  

Australians will eat their sausages with mash {Aussie for “mashed potatoes”} and they call this “bangers and mash,” which is also an English-thing, but more commonly they’ll eat their sausage wrapped in a slice of bread, which they’ll usually call a “banger sanger,” smothered with grilled onions and either tomato sauce or barbecue sauce. Sausage sandwiches are often sold for fundraising purposes outside of hardware stores like Bunnings or at a sporting event, and they call this a sausage sizzle.” Aussies also eat sausage rolls and these are wrapped in a flaky pastry and available at takeaway shops.

Saveloy:
Another English-thing the Aussies like, and known colloquially by Aussies as “savs,” saveloys are a seasoned hot dog-like sausage. They are boiled and served in a slice of bread or in a bread roll with tomato sauce.  A “battered sav” is a battered saveloy which has been battered, deep fried and served with tomato sauce.  A “battered sav” is usually also available at fish and chip shops.

“Battered sav” also carries another meaning in Aussie slang.  During their commentary of the Sydney 2000 Olympics games, Australian comedic duo Roy & HG on “The Dream” redefined “battered sav” as a gymnast move where, in some movements, a male gymnast pushes his groin to the floor and “batters” his “sav”…

How to properly cook a sausage on the barbie:
Usually Aussies cook their sausages on the barbie, and the best way to cook them is slowly over a mild heat without piercing the skin.  For best results, poach the sausages in a pan of water {or beer} on a low, steadily simmering heat for about 30 minutes. Then, using tongs, put the sausages on the cold grill and set the barbie temperature to low heat.  Be sure to cook them thoroughly, and cook them evenly by turning them often.

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Throw another prawn on the barbie...

Barbie, barby, bbq, barbecue, grill or whatever you want to call it, just like Steve Irwin and Vegemite, the barbie is an Australian cultural icon. Everyone I have met in Australia so far owns a grill {or two}, with it being at least a portable grill to take camping or to the beach.

A few things Aussies normally cook on their gas or charcoal barbie:

· Prawns
· Snags or bangers {sausages}
· Chicken {skewers, etc.}
· Steak
· Kangaroo {seriously}

Different types of fish and seafood can be added to that list, and it seem there are always onions and other veggies cooking on the grill as well.  I’ve even seen Australia-shaped hamburger patties {as seen below}…

Bring your own plate: 

At some barbecues, they’ll ask that you bring your own plate. This means you should bring a prepared dish of food to share with the host and guests.  Bring your own meat, unless asked not to.  Also ask what you should bring otherwise as well, like if you should bring a picnic blanket or camping chairs for yourself and your family.

Drinks:

BYO means bring your own drink.  It’s OK to just bring your own drinks anyway, so load up your Esky {Aussie for “ice cooler”} with your favorite favourite drinks.

· If it’s beer you’re bringing, bring at least a 6-pack.
· If you bring your own beer, it’s OK to go home with your leftover beers.

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Australia-shaped hamburger patties...

What to wear:

The chances of a family spending Christmas in their cozzies {Aussie for “swimming suits”} by the grill at the pool or at the beach is highly likely in Australia, so barbecues are not always meant to be formal.   Unless it’s supposed to be a formal event, wear whatever the weather seems to permit. Of course, you can add a little bit of some Aussie humor humour by wearing a terry towelling {Aussies say this instead of “terry cloth”} hat and some zinc on your nose à la Super Dag

Here is what you should plan otherwise:

· Bring your cozzie {swimming suit} and a beach towel along, just in case there is a pool or if you’ll be at the beach.
· Be “SunSmart.” If you’re planning on being in the sun, be sure to wear a sun hat and bring enough sunscreen for you and your family to use.
· Wear your sunnies {Aussie for “sunglasses”}.
· Feel free to rock up {Aussie for “show up”} to the party in your thongs {Aussie for “flip-flops“} too.
· Or you could just show up barefoot

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